How to Get Your Business Through a Social Media Crisis

Angry social media user
So you made a mistake on social media. Maybe it was your fault — a funny typo went viral or a well-intentioned post got some negative attention. Maybe it wasn't — somebody guessed the password and made some very embarrassing posts. Either way, you're in damage-control mode now.

Warren Buffett is credited with saying, "It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it." The explosion of social media has turned that five minutes into five seconds, since every mistake, regardless of if it's made on social media or in traditional advertising, is quickly broadcast to the world. How you react to a social media crisis will dictate whether it takes a week or a year to rebuild your reputation.

If you're trying to recover from a marketing faux pas or simply want to be prepared for the inevitable, here are some tips for getting your company through a crisis.

Have a Plan


You are never as insulated from internet infamy as you think you are. Even when you have eight people reviewing every piece of content or social media post, a simple mistake can still get through and quickly go viral. A marketing campaign that seemed like a good idea at first can still get a poor public reaction as well. That's why it's important to have a plan for potential negative backlash.

Many businesses are quick to delete posts or pull ads and quietly hope the furor all goes away over time. No matter what goes into your crisis plan, be sure you include a public statement or apology acknowledging the mistake. After that, your strategy needs to cover what you're going to do moving forward. How long will you wait before resuming your normal social media campaigns? Will you respond to negative comments directly? What will you say? Being prepared and reacting quickly can help mitigate any long-term damage.

Highlight Your Loyal Customers


Bouncing back and rebuilding your reputation after a marketing mistake is the hardest part of the process. Social media makes it easy for people to chime in about your business, especially if you've made a mistake that earns the internet's ire.

However, it's also in times like these that you might find some of your most loyal customers are willing to defend a product or service they love. Highlight these loyal customers by liking and sharing their comments. Word of mouth will always be one of the strongest forms of marketing, and using it to your advantage will help you emerge from a crisis.

Newsjack With Caution


Newsjacking to generate exposure for your brand can be a great marketing and social media tactic. However, you should never capitalize on a tragedy. If you want to acknowledge a somber event, do so tastefully and avoid putting your logo on any image or tying your comments to a product or service you offer.

Also remember that timing is everything. There's no faster way to be dragged through the mud by social media users than to have a prescheduled marketing post go out in the midst of a catastrophe. Be aware of what's going on in the world so you're not promoting a special sale or even a product launch at a sensitive time.

The internet has made it easy for word about your mistakes to get around quickly. Have you survived a social media crisis? What was your strategy for dealing with the problem? How did you prepare for any future mistakes? Let us know in the comments.

Are You Sticking to Your New Year's Resolutions?

Joggers on treadmills at a gym
More than a month has passed since 2017 began, and we're guessing the crowds at your gym have started to thin out. These days you can probably spend more time on the treadmill than you spent waiting to use one in January.

A new year is a great opportunity to start over and make improvements, and New Year's resolutions can help you take the first step. However, sticking with those resolutions — especially if you aim to lose weight — can get more difficult with every passing week. Committing to big changes to your company's marketing and customer service can feel much the same way.

The good news is it's never too late to recommit to resolutions for your business, or even start new ones. Here are some resolutions you can still pursue or continue to improve on in 2017.

Be More Social


In 2016, everybody and their dog had social media. (We're serious about the dogs.) The percentage of Americans on social media has grown every year since the beginning, reaching 78 percent last year. Social media adoption among small- and medium-sized businesses has been just as rapid, but many still struggle with how best to use their accounts.

The important thing to know about a business social media page is it's not about leads. Social media is widely regarded as a poor source for leads, meaning you should focus on fostering brand loyalty and building a community of enthusiastic followers. Just be sure you know the do's and don'ts of social media, or a silly post with good intentions could turn into an image disaster.

Answer Every Call


While social media accounts alone aren't great lead sources, social media advertising has played a role in the booming amount of phone calls to businesses being placed from smartphones. No matter what marketing approach you take in 2017, you need to be prepared for even more phone calls than in years past. Mass smartphone adoption has made it easy for customers to place calls on the fly.

When your competitor is a few finger taps away, it's more important than ever to make sure calls from your customers — whether they're sales opportunities or customer service issues — are answered and getting to the right people in your business. Fewer and fewer people are leaving voicemails, meaning it's critical for you to either answer every call or to at least capture incoming call information so somebody can follow up with a missed call promptly.

Cut the Excess


Losing weight is one of the top New Year's resolutions every year, which is why your gym was so crowded in January. Just as cutting excess weight can make you healthier, trimming marketing campaigns that aren't generating a healthy return on investment (ROI) can make your marketing investments more efficient.

But while we can just step on a scale to see if we're making progress with weight loss, measuring marketing ROI can be more challenging. Consider using a service that can link everything from phone calls and website clicks back to specific marketing campaigns or search terms. Knowing your lead sources will help you find campaigns that need to meet the same end as those extra holiday pounds.

You should always be seeking to improve your company, but the New Year is a good time to take a renewed focus. What are some resolutions you targeted for your company's marketing in 2017? Have you stuck with them so far? Let us know in the comments.